American chamber music society

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If you want to rock out this Saturday, check out Vagabon at the Silent Barn. They’re opening for Aye Nako (an incredible pop-punk band, releasing their new album), hopefully playing some tunes off of their 2014 release Persian Garden. Laetitia Tamko’s ragged vocals chase distorted lead guitar lines to devastating and gorgeous effect.

We all know that sound is a wave. The curves and spikes of our friend the “waveform” are a graphic representation of that wave’s action, traveling physically through air. If I clap my hands and record it into my DAW, the peaks and troughs on the screen represent the fluctuating changes in air pressure that cause the sensory phenomenon we call sound. These ripples of pressure in the air make our eardrums vibrate, so we can hear that sound.

Imagine you have a synth bass line that’s a combination of a sine and a saw wave instrument. You like the vibe, but when you turn them both up you aren’t feeling the fatness. That’s likely because the low frequencies of the combined signal are suffering from destructive interference.

Modern rap groups

Lalita had some help in that scramble to barricade her bedroom window. Her mother and sister, their cat, and her brother and girlfriend and their four cats, all took shelter in the apartment she shares with three roommates (and more cats). Later, they had to work together to stop the flooding while rain relentlessly poured into her living room, where her brother had been sleeping on a mat on the floor and awoke abruptly, realizing he was soaking wet.

New wave and post-punk era bassists did a lot of single-note chugging on root notes of chords. No offense to them; it’s what the music called for. As a consequence, bass players in those genres, like Peter Hook, Adam Clayton, and John Taylor, tend to be pretty underrated. But those minimalist bass parts actually did allow room for some subtle fill-ins to really stick out.

Learn about underwater acoustics and how sounds travel in different directions and across far distances via a marine audio highway called the SOFAR Channel.

Due to the way that YouTube’s algorithms have recently started moving users around based on several years worth of tracking their preferences, recommending content that is not always the obvious next step (because if you simply want the next track on an artist’s album, you’re probably already on Spotify), and then leveraging “discovery results” that are considered successful, thousands upon thousands of listeners streaming long-playing ambient music and sounds have been led directly to user Jackamo Brown‘s upload of Through the Looking Glass. The record had found its audience.

Crowdfunding’s magic lies in the fact that it takes both artists and fans to make a project happen. It’s not the typical, one-sided creative conversation that the music industry has been having for nearly 100 years. And although skimming through live campaigns on a regular basis is difficult if you’re looking after the health of your wallet, there’s really no better way to get a glimpse of the myriad ways music can connect people.

Grants for independent curators

A delicate balance between music career and everything else important in life needs to be struck by musicians who want to sustain their careers. For example, you might want to spend every waking hour making music, but if doing so isn’t making you money yet, it’s not a realistic option. And this balance doesn’t just involve money. Your close, non-musical relationships have to be prioritized as well and maintained if you want to continue to benefit from having friends and family as a safety net in your life.

When musicians set out to dominate the world with their music, they usually envision playing to sold-out stadiums and amphitheaters of screaming fans, not living rooms in front of only a handful of attentive listeners. But believe it or not, for lots of artists, house shows end up being more beneficial and sustainable than ones played at traditional venues, and organizations like Sofa Concerts are trying to connect more artists with even more opportunities to everyone’s benefit.

Take the next steps in your music career with Soundfly’s curated Hustle series of articles and popular online course offerings on topics like how to book a tour on a shoestring, how to get all the royalties you never knew existed, and how to let your fans fund your next music project! Use code FLYPAPERSENTME for 20% (that’s $100!) off any course on the site that isn’t free! 

+ Learn more on Soundfly: Deepen your production and composition relationship with Ableton Live in our various courses that use the software, such as Beat Making in Ableton Live, Making Realistic MIDI Strings, Live Clicks and Backing Tracks, and Any Sound Will Do (sampling and stitching). Check out our full course offerings here.

You know that wretched feeling you get when it’s 3 AM and you still haven’t begun loading out from the venue, and you have to be up in three hours to make it to your next show in Sacramento?